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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 97 (some duplicates have been removed)
is when the boomers turn 67 when they start getting sick and drawing down on the government's health benefit programs. what do you think about that? >> right. well, look, this is a president that's completely wedded to the social welfare state of the 20th century, looking to advantage the agenda as far as into the 21st century as possible. this is a president who nationalized our health care system, and as bob noted, trying to take that agenda to energy policy and climate change. we've seen it already, manufacturing the whole idea of green energy jobs, and in effect, trying to get rid of traditional energy. i think that we have to be very aware of what's happening here. i think there was a lot of fancy language used in the inaugural address, but the fact is that that doesn't cover up what's really going on here, which is to grow the progressive state. liz: let me back up, listen, we've. covering this issue for awhile now with fox news and fox business, and here's the issue. will the u.s. start looking like a mature european country? is the u.s. coming towards, you know, sort of an id
sequesters with cuts in other areas of government. we have shown how to protect defense spending by cutting spending in other areas. in our budget last year, we did take money out of defense. just not nearly as much as the president seems to want to. but we think the sequesters will happen because the democrats have opposed our efforts to replace those cuts with others and offered no alternatives. >> is this worth shutting the government down over? >> no one is talking about shutting the government down. >> well, it's a piece of the leverage that conservatives have. you didn't want to fight over the debt ceiling because you thought you can't do that, you have to pay the government's bills. do you think this fight over priority is worth shutting the government down? >> we're not interested in shutting the government down. what happens on march 1 is spending goes down automatically. march 27 is when the moment you're talking about, the continuing resolution expires. we are more than happy to keep spending at those levels going on into the future while we debate how to balance the budget, grow
a cover story about the failure of americans to understand our government. some very scary statistics. two out of every three graduating high-school students today believe that the three branches of government are republican, democrat, and independent. that is an actual poll. 75% of all americans don't know that religious freedom is protected by the first amendment. 75%. more americans can name the judges on "american idol" than on the supreme court of the united states. what does this mean to us? how did we get here? well, first of all, unless the next generation understands the obligations imposed by the constitution, we are going to have a serious, serious problem. my children can always tell me about their rights, but very rarely tell me about their responsibilities. those responsibilities are critical to our future as a country. the fact of the matter is, if we do not understand the constitution, if our children do not understand the constitution, and appreciate the separation of powers, and appreciate the different roles that are branches of government are meant to play, how are our
and drawing down on the government's health benefit programs. what do you think about that? >> right. well, look this is a president that's completely wedded to the social welfare state of the 20th century, looking to advantage the agenda as far as into the 21st century as possible. this is a president who nationalized our health care system, and as bob noted, trying to take that agenda to energy policy and climate change. we've seen it already manufacturing the whole idea of green energy jobs, and in effect, trying to get rid of traditional energy. i think that we have to be very aware of what's happening here. i think there was a lot of fancy language used in the inaugural address, but the fact is that that doesn't cover up what's really going on here, which is to grow the progressive state. liz: let me back up listen, we've. covering this issue for awhile now with fox news and fox business, and here's the issue. will the u.s. start looking like a mature european country? is the u.s. coming towards you know, sort of an i
of tripartheid branches that notably do not have enough power to govern alone. madisonian austin. or four congresses have been the worst in the history of united states of the total abandonment of the check and balance. fact he is by letting court liberal and democratic values. the republicans took that same position under bush says they are silent. the result is, we have now check on that authority. to make matters worse, the court system has largely been taken offline. when president obama said that he can define whether something is a war and therefore circumvent congress and intervene in the libyan civil about intervening in syria -- i went to the core with members of congress and the challenge a democrat and republican and these are the good members. we said you are circumventing a clear requirement of the constitution. we could not get a hearing because the courts of limited standing, as it is called. there are now many constitutional violations that cannot be subject to judicial review because no one has standing. we have a latent violations of the constitution and we literally can
for government. government does help a lot of people get places. we don't agree on that obviously, but -- >> dana: do you think that has s what he has been saying all along? if you compare the 2008 speech to this one, it's the same? >> bob: what i would say in this without sour grapes. in 2008 he tried to break across the gridlock and he didn't get anywhere so now he will go alone. >> eric: a lot of people on the right said he thinks he has a mandate because he was re-elected. his speech sounded like i have a mandate for the next term, the next four years. he talked about gay rights and climb change. weeping entitlement off the table. equal pay and immigration. those are things we'll hear in the next four years. it reads like a liberal agenda, top to bottom, i am going after it and getting it done. too bad, you lost, i won. looks like another victory lap. >> dana: we will get in sound bites later. the parade is still going on and the president and mrs. obama, the girls are in the viewing area. so we will continue to show you that while we get thoughts overall. when you look at the family, give me
yesterday with one reference to the deficit. if no debt limit is reached, however, the government could default on its obligations within weeks so watch that story. martha: well, this is an interesting one. pro golfer, phil mickelson, doing a little bit of backpedaling today saying he regrets the public comments he made on the issue of his taxes in california. mickelson said he may move out when he made the original comments, of the state, because all taxes combined end up to more than 60% tax rate. now he is telling fox news contributor jim gray, quote, finances and taxes are a personal matter and i should not have made a opinions of, on them public. i apologize to those who i have upset or insulted and i assure you i intend not to let it happen again. why would he feel the need to do that? stuart varney, joins me, anchor of "varney & company" on the fox business network. stuart, this is an interesting one. >> it really is. the left beat up on phil mickelson big-time because he complained about all the tax money he has now got to pay. specifically you had, basically the left is saying
that is the federal budget. we have seemed to have an obsession with government bookkeeping. this is a rigged game, and it is the wrong game for us to play. >> and in a barely veiled reference to mitt romney and other republicans, jindal said republicans need to make it clear that they are a, quote, populous party. >> we must quit being -- we are not the party of big business, big banks, big wall street bailouts, big corporate looph e loopholes, or big anything. we must not be the party that simply protects the welloff, so they can keep their toys. >> nbc's senior political editor, mark murray is here, and he joins me now. and mark, it seems is if at any time a party gets thumped, they always have this come to jesus moment. we need to change what we've been doing before, we need to radically alter our strategy. reince priebus is going to say this to the rnc. "it's time to stop lacking at elections through the lens of battleground states. we have four years until the next presidential election, and being a blue state is not a permanent diagnosis. simple outreach a few months before an election wil
last night. plus, the world economic forum, the most powerful names in business and government gathering in davos, switzerland. wednesday, january 23, 2013. and "squawk box" begins right now. ♪ >>> welcome to "squawk box" on cnbc, i'm becky quick with ross westgate. andrew is reporting from switzerland. that's why we've got the mountain music. we'll get to andrew in a moment. first, the top stories. the common theme here quarterly results, shares of google getting a boost. earnings and revenue topping consensus and perhaps more important metrics, revenue from google's core internet business. it outpaced many analysts' expectations. advertising rates fell less than in proves periods. as you see, the stock was up -- this morning up almost 5% in the premarket. ibm shares jumping after the bell. earnings and revenue beating the street, as well. the world's largest technology services company offering a better than expected outlook for 2013. that stock, as you see, up by 4% in the premarket. also, we had advanced microdevices. it came in with a smaller than expected loss in the fo
government panel. this is "special report." ♪ ♪ good evening i'm bret baier. major setback today for president obama's effort to stack a key government board with like-minded people but without senate approval. chief white house correspondent ed hyperion a federal appeals court say nothing to the president. over picks for the national labor relations board. a ruling that could have big implications. >> reporter: as he rolled out dennis mcdonough, president obama hoping for a smooth start to the second term. instead, brushed back by a federal appeals court, rulings wherely he violated the constitution last year. >> it was just a huge massive overstep of executive power. unconstitutional power grab. >> it semis from dramatic election year showdown where the president bypassed the senate and put three picks on the national labor relations board, using the recess appointments on january 4, 2012. power the white house continues to defend vociferously today. >> the decision is novel and unprecedented. it contradicts 150 years of practice by democratic and republican administrations. >>
, it was very different from the way he, you know, governed for the last four years or attempted to govern. he came at it from sort of a centrist, pragmatist approach, and it didn't work out so well for him a lot of the times. he faced a congress in republican hands for the last two years in the house that did not, you know, accept his agenda or pass it through the way he would like it. so i think he learned from this election, gave him the confidence to say the election delivered a mandate for my vision of government, my vision of politics, one that involves gay rights, immigration, climate change, an issue that he hasn't really spoken of since his attempts to deal with it in 2009, fell short. so this was really a different president coming out, using the election as a turning point for his agenda and really making clear that that cautious pragmatist of the last four years, that often came out, is going to give way to someone who is unabashedly starting negotiations from a more progressive liberal standpoint than he was willing to do in the recent past. >> not surprisingly, there's been some
that we do what we can as a federal and as state governments to protect our citizens is primary. >> schieffer: you're going to have a pretty important job coming up here shortly once john kerry is confirmed as secretary of state. every indication is that he will be. you're going to have to appoint somebody to replace him. >> i've heard that, (laughs) >> pelley: give us a clue. >> no clues today other than it will be somebody who is aligned with the president's ageneral the, will be a good partner to the president and the majority leader, which is important. i always remind our citizens back theme the main event is not the interim appointee, it's the election of a new senator in the special election. that's what we need to focus on. >> schieffer: i take it will be a democrat? >> it will be a democrat. the. >> pelley: governor patrick, thank you for joining us. we have in the capitol rotunda a very special guest today, valerie jarrett, senior advisor to the president and i day air is the person in washington who has known the president and first lady longest, being a long-time fri
job. leaving that aside, if we get closer to parliamentary type of government. both sides went to extreme. if you're john boehner and may be more reasonable than the caucus and obama may be more reasonable than the caucus they can't get them to to it for bipartisanship. every year this is more polarized. >> eric: every president in the second term, most moved to the center. ronald reagan and bill clinton and george moving to center. this is going the other way. far left. >> the difference of this one versus a republican. view asked him what his favorite color was. we have video and audiotape of the press lining up the questions they were going to attack him with. i ask this and you ask that. hypocrisy over the way they treat the right and the left. >> dana: the truth is they don't think it's obama's fault. they think it started with president bush. >> greg: but a republican would find them as extremist. >> bob: house of representatives are the most polarized of all the caucuses. thank hillary clinton, benghazi, the division and the -- >> andrea: they should talk about the thing
and creating an environment for businesses to invest because they think governments are being responsible, things have slowed down so much there's been so much unemployment, 11.6% in the euro zone than it's having the opposite effect. we have to find a more dalan ba approach to how we go forward. europe has a disproportionate influence of this conversation. there is a conversation particularly vis-a-vis the united states as to how much is too much and how much austerity, how much in terms of cutting back is actually enough, christine? >> really nice to see you. when you run into indiana jones, he can have his hat back. nice to see you. >> how many bars are there over the world that have pictures of you in them? >> no, i turned 28 at a davos -- last year -- and it was one of the best birthdays ever. first time i ever ran into kings and bankers and princesses. it's really an interesting .01% of the global leaders. >> with the official public swearing inform the president all done, you know that, small matter over, the really big news of the day -- what was she wearing? look at that lovely r
. they gave to us a republic, a government of and by and for the people, entrusting each generation to keep safe our founding creed. for more of the 200 years we have had. we have learned that no union founded on the principles of liberty and equality could survive half buried. we made ourselves a new and we vowed to move forward together. together we determined that a modern economy requires railroads and highways to see travel and commerce. schools and colleges to train our workers. together we discovered that a free market only works with your competition and fair play. together we resolve that a great nation must care for it the vulnerable and protect its people from life's worst hazards and misfortunes. to it all, we have never relinquished our skepticism of central authority. nor have we succumb to the fictions that ills can be cured through government alone. our celebration of a nation, and enterprise, our insistence on hard work and personal responsibility. these are constant in our character. we have always understood that when times change, so we do too. fidelity to our founding p
, cut spending. if that means shut down the government, shut down the government. >> i think in williamsburg, we saw one possibility, which was paul ryan and others within the republican party saying to the caucus, we can't win this fight publicly. let the debt ceiling go because we're going to be blamed for the economic fallout. let's push that down the road, kick the can down the road, as they say, and try to get some budget out of the senate and try to get some real spending cuts in the next three months. so paul ryan and others within the caucus are seeing a longer game here than is this freshman senator from texas. >> but if you ask paul ryan what he wants to do on gun control, he would say, i don't want to do anything on gun control. you've talked to moderate republicans -- >> what about registration? >> the only thing they might do is something on registration. >> background checks. >> that's it. no idea that you're banning weapons. no chance. >> registration is the worst. >> put it on tape. 0% chance it passes. >> good, because hunters need 30 bullets. >> if you've se
with republicans, make government work. and when you look at a guy like joe biden in four years, that's a good record to run on. >> gop want to run against joe biden? would you say, great, he's running for the presidency? >> part of you that says, yeah, we want to hear what he has to say, when he opens his mouth, sometimes something comes out you don't expect, that he doesn't expect, and that makes it fun. >> look what he did this week. spoke to an iowa group during the inauguration weekend. who did he invite? the new hampshire governor. >> soledad, i was at naacp convention in houston when he spoke. and folks can get mad all they want to. but i'm telling you right now, he gave a more fired up speech that rocked that crowd that even president obama has. he lit that place up. >> he is definitely a performer. loves to be in front of the issues. fun to watch. >> interesting to see if that performance aspect and authenticity, does that translate to 2016? hard to believe we are only a couple of days into the new inauguration. >> don't forget all of the dentists that love him. >>> the nra launches a
and government forces have fought over local power, ethnic hatred, and control of the minerals. we heard it firsthand from former rebel soldiers. this a school that teaches guerilla fighters who've laid down their guns how to be civilians again. >> [speaking in foreign language] >> this former major told us that when his troops controlled a territory, he demanded gold from every miner every day. >> male translator: we collected gold, and then we went to buy medicines. we went to buy ammunition. we went to buy guns. >> who sold you the ammunition and the guns? >> we would buy those things from congolese army soldiers. >> he's saying that government troops sold weapons to him, the enemy. congo is so destitute that even its army goes without pay and becomes just another predator among the villages. john prendergast worked on africa policy in president clinton's white house. now he runs a group called the enough project, that exposes war crimes. what keeps this war going? >> well, you know, follow the money. it's good old-fashioned greed. we got kings and corporations and countries that have
by the dawn's early light ♪ country can do for you. >> the government is not the solution to our problem. government is the problem. >> a new breeze is blowing. and the nation refreshed by freedom, stands ready to push on. >> there is nothing wrong with america that cannot be cured by what is right with america. >> the best hope for peace in our world is the expansion of freedom in all the world. >> and we are ready to lead once more. >>> cbs news coverage of the second inauguration of barack obama. from capitol hill, here is scott pelley. >> good morning. the nation's capital is beginning a day-long celebration of american freedom and democracy. for the 57th time in our history, a president freely elected by the people is being sworn in to office. just before noon at the capitol, barack obama will take the oath for his second term as president. this is a ceremonial swearing-in because the constitution requires the president to be sworn in on january 20th, and this year the 20th fell on sunday. so the president took the official oath in private yesterday in the blue room at the white hou
on the u.s. government after hacking the federal sentencing commission's website overnight. in a video they posted on that site along with a letter dressed to citizens of the world, anonymous is threatening chaos if the government doesn't meet their demands which includes limiting the power of the federal prosecutors to go after and, quote, destroy the lives of hacktivists. this month's suicide of web activist schwartz triggered the latest attack. schwartz was facing charges and could've faced 35 years in prison. >>> hillary clinton is wrapping up her time at the state department. this week, she testified before two congressional committees about benghazi. next week will be her last as secretary of state. she and her boss talked with "60 minutes" about her time on the job. >> why did you want to do this together? a joint interview? >> well, the main thing is, i just wanted to have a chance to publicly say thank you. i think hillary will go down as one of the finest secretaries of state we've had. it has been a great collaboration over the last four years. i'm going to miss her, wish sh
the enforcement of the federal debt limit for at least three months, allowing the government to keep borrowing money to pay for all of its current obligations. in exchange, the house gop'ers want the democratic-controlled senate to do something they haven't done in 1,365 days, pass a budget. something that body hasn't done since 2009. now, instead of demanding spending cuts, republicans have added a provision to the bill that would suspend lawmakers' own paychecks if their chamber fails to pass a budget by april 15th. that's a lot like actually the no labels, no budget, no pay plan that that organization's been dealing with, talking about for a long time. michael steele, i think that's a great idea. >> i do, too. >> if you don't do your job -- >> why get paid for it? >> and the democrats in the senate haven't done their job in that many days, why pay them? >> i don't think you should. in fact, if i had my way, it would be retro. so i'd take back the money we paid you over the last four years for not doing your job. and i think, you know, again, some people say that's a political toy or a tacti
by the government are one size fits all, any government determination of an individual's abilities must be based on a bureaucratic assessment of the lowest possible denominator. i think that's exactly what we have done in response to these mass shootings. solving this problem is something the government, bureaucratically knows it can't really do and offers up the bureaucratic solutions that don't really address any of the existential problems here and maybe not doesn't matter what politically possible or what's popular but what should actually be done. >> well, i strongly agree. i think what's the point of what i'm writing. right now, you have a host of democrats who do not appear to be voting on their conscience. they're voting on electoral, you know, the fear of electoral politics. >> right. >> in this sin stance, that's not supported. i don't know the right answer. i'm from the west. i, you know, know plenty of people with guns. i don't have visceral opposition to people owning firearms. >> right. >> but i think that senators should make up their minds based on the substance of policy and tha
to maintain his relevancy and have a shelf life on this party, that he needs to join the government. he needs to exercise the kind of power and influence that is required to service and fulfill his agenda. >> he has a lot of different ideas to benjamin netanyahu, doesn't he? >> he does, clearly, but remember, benjamin netanyahu is the master of the israeli economy which has done quite well although they're now facing serious austerity concerns and are going to have to impose some of them on the public. on the peace issue, i think there's actually quite a lot of consensus between lapid and netanyahu, both support, nominally, a two state situation. like netanyahu and his father, tommy lapid, he's against the division of jerusalem. so i wouldn't hold my breath that whatever israeli government that emerges is going to be able to take major decisions on the israel yanl palestinian decisions because it's going to be a broader government. it's on the rule of the orthodox, national service, socioeconomic issues and perhaps on iran. >> a lot of people think that the center in israel, it's really much
and renewal this time around, but is the government broken? the whole system. and what can we do to fix it? people want washington and its politicians to work together. the politicians as yet have not been a i believe to figure out how to do that. but, you know, inaugural speeches can sometimes change the mood. you heard fdr, the only thing we have to fear. i remember when gerald ford said our long national nightmare is over. jack kennedy, ask not what you can do for your country. difference in how the nation feels about itself and about what's going on. i would say this. if there was a time when this country needed to hear a good speech and wanted to hear a good one, i think this would be the time. so let's hope we get a good one. >> of course, there was lincoln's second inaugural where he talked about the wounds of the nation. we know that the president has been working on this president for weeks and major garrett, our chief white house correspondent, is at the white house this morning with a little bit of insight on what we might hear today. >> well, good morning, scott. those closest
years? >> i hope he's learned that you know, no one part of the government, really, gets it all done. and so, he's got to do a better job of reaching out to members of congress, across both -- across the aisle, to the republicans. and the republicans have to stop buying into things that demonize the president. why aren't republican leaders shouting out about all this birther nonsense and these other things? they're silent. they need to speak out. this is the kind of intolerance i've been talking about, where these idiot presentations continue to be made. and you don't see the senior leadership of the party say, no, that's wrong. sometimes, by not speaking out, they're encouraging it. and the base keeps buying this stuff. and it's killing the base and party. 26% favorability rate for the party right now. that ought to be telling them something. you know? instead of attacking, whoever speaks, look in the mirror and say, how are we going to win the next election? >> and looking overseas, we know governments over the world will be pouring over this speech for every nuance, at this time,
the government and automatic steep spending cuts that could cost thousands of jobs. welcome to the new normal in washington. joining us now from davos, switzerland, is cnbc's squawk box co-host "new york times" columnist and author of too big to fail, andrew ross sorkin. it is great to see you. i can't see the snowcapped mountains in the background, but i'm sure they are there. >> you can't? come on. they're there. they're there. i promise. >> i believe you. >> i promise. >> i want to ask you, andrew, what is the view from davos? >> colder, by the way, in new york than here, apparently. what did you say, alex? >> that's the climate change block that we'll keep you on for later. in terms of the view from davos, here we are fiddling around with the u.s. economy. what do the world's great financial and fiscal minds have to say regarding the antics in washington? >> well, i'll tell you, actually, the prevailing few here, and eric cantor just arrived. the prevailing view is that even in three months from now, the idea that we've punted on this issue, i think the prevailing view here is that we pun
side, c-4s and c-3s, the poor which need help from the government. but i notice the president -- he had a line in his speech where he said every job -- the nation needs to find a decent wage for every worker. really? you know, there is supply and demand. there is a new role for government, and it's a more active role. >> is that a role for government, or could that be read, that is the american dream, the promise of america, which is people who come from nothing in a generation can become something, which as you well know, very unusual in many other countries. america is the place where that story is possible, and elsewhere it's really not. >> that's right. and -- and i guess you could interpret it either way and that's the debate. that's the debate. will it be the role of government or supply and demand and the natural market. >> the raising of a president, the mother and fathers of our nation's leaders. thank you for joining us. >> let's get to john berman. >>> the testimony many americans have been waiting months to hear. secretary of state hillary clinton will testify about the atta
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 97 (some duplicates have been removed)

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